Male in the aquarium
Adult male of Paratilapia polleni "Andapa" in the aquarium of Patrick de Rham, Laussane [Switzerland] (Sep-1999). This specimen was taken to Switzerland back from andapa as small juvenile in late 1997, and originated from one of Mr. Tam Hyock ponds, where he was breeding the species to preserve it. Photo by Juan Miguel Artigas Azas. determiner Patrick de Rham

Family
Cichlidae

Sub-family
Ptychochrominae

Genus
Paratilapia

Status
valid


Curator

Published:

Last updated on:
08-May-2022

Paratilapia polleni Bleeker, 1868

Akandra; Ampirina; Famanga; Fony; Marakely; Pollen's cichlid; Trondro marakely.


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Original description as Paratilapia polleni:

ZooBank:7E50E078-E9F0-4402-BB56-F4C34E3B9660.

  • Bleeker, Pieter. 1868. "Description de trois espèces inédites de Chromidoïdes de Madagascar". Verslagen en Mededeelingen van de Koninklijke Akademie van Wetenschappen te Amsterdam, Afdeeling Natuurkunde. 2:307-309 (crc00015)

Synonyms (1):

cares

Conservation: Paratilapia polleni is evaluated by the international union for the conservation of nature in the iucn red list of threatened species as (VU) vulnerable (2016). Whereas populations in Nosy-Be island appear to be stable for the time being, mainland populations are threatened by rampant deforestation and habitat degradation or destruction throughout their range. Diversion of water for large-scale irrigation projects poses a particular threat to the populations of this species in the basins of the Mananjeba and the Mahavavy du Nord (Ravelomanana, 2016).

Introduction of a number of exotic species, including Micropterus salmoides (large-mouth bass), and Ophiocephalus striatus (snakehead), have also contributed in displacing populations of this species (Reinthal et al., 1991).